Bidding Prayer

"Upon Another Shore"

"Upon Another Shore"

One of the mysteries of our faith is that God transcends space and time and connects us across barriers that otherwise divide. We are united in Jesus with Christians who gather in other places of worship – not just those down the street, but those across the world. We are united in Jesus with Christians who came before and those who will come after us. The carols we sing together Sunday have been sung by people on other continents in other centuries and by people who held us close on Christmas Eves long ago. As we sing those familiar carols, those we love, but who now sing their praises “upon another shore” may well come to heart and mind. Sing with them once more. 

"Let Us Remember"

"Let Us Remember"

While we are comfortably gathered in Central’s sanctuary Sunday afternoon for The Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols, there will be people in our community and far beyond in very uncomfortable, sad, and vulnerable situations. There will be people outside our doors and throughout the world who are physically and spiritually hungry and don’t know where to turn. Even as we know plenty and joy Sunday afternoon, the Bidding Prayer demands we have on our hearts those who do not. 

"Rejoice Jesus' Heart"

"Rejoice Jesus' Heart"

I don’t think enough about what would “rejoice Jesus’ heart.” I have the ratio out of balance – I think too much about what would bring me joy and not enough about what would bring Jesus joy. The Bidding Prayer tells us that our concern for God’s world, God’s people, for peace and goodwill on earth, and for love and unity in the church brings Jesus joy. 

Glad with Praise

Glad with Praise

The Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols Bidding Prayer continues:

Therefore let us hear again from Holy Scripture
the tale of the loving purposes of God from the first days of our sin
until the glorious redemption brought us by this holy Child;
and let us make this house of prayer glad with our carols of praise.

"Message of the Angels"

"Message of the Angels"

You may have noticed in yesterday’s reading of the gospel (Luke 3:1-6) that Luke tried to take us to a particular place and time. He was careful in his “orderly account” (Luke 1:1) to date John the Baptizer’s proclamation by naming those who were in power. He listed a king, a governor, three rulers, and two high priests to give his hearers a sense of the time period. It was a more vivid description (and a more typical way of doing history in those times) than saying “in the year 28” or “about 50 years ago.” Think of the descriptive difference between, “I was born in 1974” and “I was born during the first months of Gerald Ford’s presidency, in the final months of Governor West’s term, a few months before the end of the Vietnam War, and in a time when ‘The Way We Were’ topped the charts.”