Blessings and Woes (Part 2)

Blessings and Woes (Part 2)

If one wanted to make a Biblical argument for what’s commonly called “Prosperity Gospel” (and plenty do), all he or she needs to do is select the blessings and ignore the woes. They can lift up the “If/then” passages of the Bible – if you do this, then you will be blessed – while ignoring the scriptural evidence that life is more complex than computer programming. If Genesis, Job, and Ecclesiastes don’t make the case for the unpredictability of blessings and woes, check out just two of Jesus’ comments on the subject: Luke 13:1-5 and John 9.  

Blessings and Woes

Blessings and Woes

This Sunday’s gospel lesson, Luke 6:17-26, is one that should give people like me pause. Compared with nearly everyone in the world, I am rich. I can’t tell you the last time I was truly hungry and there has never been a time when I had to wonder about having a sufficient meal. I laugh more than I weep. And, for the most part, people seem to speak well of me. What am I to make of Jesus’ list of woes for people like me? People like us. Should we aspire to be poor, hungry, mournful, and hated? Do we just dismiss Jesus’ strong language as hyperbole?

If You Say So

If You Say So

Sunday’s scriptures can easily fall under the heading of “Call Stories.”  Isaiah 6:1-8 presents an other-worldly scene with flying creatures and the reverberation of “Holy, holy, holy is the Lord of hosts.” Overwhelmed by God’s glory and by his own unworthiness, Isaiah responds to the wild scene and God’s open question, “Whom shall I send,” with “Send me!”

Difficult Discussions

Difficult Discussions

If it surprises you that Jesus would disturb people to the point of them wanting to throw him off a cliff (Luke 4:14-30), you may have forgotten that that wasn’t the last time people attempted to kill him. You also may have forgotten the last time you had a difficult discussion with people you love and respect. It’s easy to dismiss some talking head on television as an idiot or mean-spirited or whatever when all they are to you is a caricature of a position with which you disagree. It’s far more difficult to let go of a strong word or criticism or different point of view when it’s someone with whom you spend time, work or worship alongside, share vacations or even homes. The closer the person is, the deeper the comment is felt and the longer it lingers

A Ministry to All

A Ministry to All

A prophet announces things. Sometimes those things are about what is to come, often based on what has already occurred. (It didn’t take a crystal ball for Old Testament prophets to predict that Israel would drift away from God – there was a well-established cycle of drawing near and fading away across the centuries.) Too much emphasis has been placed on the prophets’ reputation for announcing messages about the future. A primary job is to announce what is the current reality – that’s the form of Jesus’ prophecy in Sunday’s gospel reading (Luke 4:21-30).

Your Merciful Ministry

Your Merciful Ministry

Some of us scoffed Sunday at the very idea of being in worship for 6 hours (as was the crowd in Nehemiah 8:1-12).  Only later did it occur to many of us that we were at Central for 6+ hours that day doing the Lord’s work.  No one stood in the same place for hours on end.  No one continually read and interpreted scripture like a holy filibuster, but the church leaders were together aiming to get the year off to a good start.

Extravagant Gifts

Extravagant Gifts

Our college chaplain prayed the same prayer of thanksgiving every time the offering was presented in worship. It’s a version of 1 Chronicles 29:14b. He’d pray, “All good things come of thee, O Lord. We give thee but thine own.”

Our church joins many around the world in singing a similar sentiment each week: Praise God from whom all blessings flow. We sing that as we return to God a representative portion of the good, the blessings that have come our way by God’s grace.

"I love you because..."

"I love you because..."

Jesus initiated exactly one act in Luke’s gospel prior to the Father proclaiming, “You are my Son, the Beloved; with you I am well pleased” (Luke 3:22). That one act was not a pleasing act to Mary and Joseph. He cost them three days of worry by remaining at the temple while they began their return to Nazareth (Luke 2:41-52).

Baptism Renewal

Baptism Renewal

Here’s your pop-quiz for today: How many sacraments does The United Methodist Church recognize? You got it: 2 – Baptism and Holy Communion. Enjoy quizzes? Take this one about the UMC’s beliefs about baptism: http://www.umc.org/what-we-believe/united-methodist-baptism-quiz.

One way we describe sacraments is to say they are those things that Jesus did and commanded us to do. He was baptized (Luke 3:15-22) and he commanded us to baptize (Matthew 28:16-20). He communed and commanded us to – “Do this in remembrance of me” (Luke 22:14-23).

Where are they now?

Where are they now?

There are t.v. “specials” and websites aplenty to satisfy our interest in “Where are they now?” If you want to know what happened to your favorite teenage star after the show ended or what happened when the bright lights and big money of major sports faded, the information is out there. I’d like a similar (if less salacious) follow up on some Biblical characters. Where did the rich man go after Jesus told him to sell all he had and give it to the poor and follow him (Luke 18:18-30)? Did he sell any and give some? How much? Did he ever meet back up with Jesus and follow? What was next for Mary Magdalene after Jesus’ ascension? And, more related to yesterday’s gospel lesson (Matthew 2:1-12), what did the magi do after they left Bethlehem having knelt before Jesus?

Adjusting Our Plans

Adjusting Our Plans

We usually keep our decorations up for Christmas through January 6th. We’re so busy in Advent that we need the 12 days of Christmas to exhale and enjoy what we worked so hard to prepare. We’ll do that with many of our decorations this year, but not our tree. It expired on January 1st – too dry. 

Happy New Year!

Happy New Year!

The following is a prayer from The United Methodist Book of Worship (#294). It’s intended use is New Year’s Eve or New Year’s. Sometime in the next 24 hours (now is a perfectly fine time to do it!), make space to pray the prayer attentively. Rather than just reading the words or saying them aloud, pause on them – what are your new desires? What are your old fears? Etc. Let them lead you into reflecting on the good and bad of the year behind you and on what you hope to make of the year ahead. Reflect on God who is in the midst of all of it and will continue to be. Let the prayer lead you into prayers of your own. 

Light of the World

Light of the World

This Christmas Eve, as we do most every year, we will hear Luke 2:1-20. It’s the familiar story of Jesus’ birth and the shepherds arriving after the angel’s announcement. It’s what expect to hear on Christmas Eve. 

Near the end of the service, we will do something that’s become expectation: we will light and raise our candles. That’s in keeping with the Christmas Day scripture: John 1:1-14. We stand firm on the promise of John 1:5 – The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not overcome it.

"Why me?"

"Why me?"

“And why has this happened to me?” Elizabeth asked. We’ve all asked. Mary asked it in her own way – How can this be? Those are familiar questions, especially when something goes wrong. Job loss or difficulties, health concerns, family struggles. Why me?  How could this happen?

The Meaning of These Days

The Meaning of These Days

As a church this weekend we hosted the Parking Lot Mission and fed warm breakfasts to financially-poor neighbors, helped 48 children in Florence County receive beds and bedding of their own, were led in worship by children of God from ages 4-84, and invited the community to hear the story of God’s love while joining us in supporting The CARE House of the Pee Dee. It was a good weekend of sharing what God has provided us (Luke 3:10-11) and honoring the God who gives us far more than we can ever give in return.

"Upon Another Shore"

"Upon Another Shore"

One of the mysteries of our faith is that God transcends space and time and connects us across barriers that otherwise divide. We are united in Jesus with Christians who gather in other places of worship – not just those down the street, but those across the world. We are united in Jesus with Christians who came before and those who will come after us. The carols we sing together Sunday have been sung by people on other continents in other centuries and by people who held us close on Christmas Eves long ago. As we sing those familiar carols, those we love, but who now sing their praises “upon another shore” may well come to heart and mind. Sing with them once more. 

"Let Us Remember"

"Let Us Remember"

While we are comfortably gathered in Central’s sanctuary Sunday afternoon for The Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols, there will be people in our community and far beyond in very uncomfortable, sad, and vulnerable situations. There will be people outside our doors and throughout the world who are physically and spiritually hungry and don’t know where to turn. Even as we know plenty and joy Sunday afternoon, the Bidding Prayer demands we have on our hearts those who do not.